My Truths: Yammerings of a newly 24 year old

Disclaimer: This is not a J.K. Rowling post. I have no idea how it ends writing it now. It may make no sense ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. This is basically just a list of some random thoughts.

I believe you can accept and love yourself and still want to change parts of yourself.
I believe the ability to adapt is crucial to finding happiness.
I believe that differences are necessary for society.
I believe that artists and musicians do more for the greater mental health of our stress ball of a society than we give them credit and resources to do.
I believe we can all benefit from giving more people the benefit of doubt.
I believe that vulnerability is critical to human connection.
I believe that there are times to push and times to rest in life and that finding the perfect balance may be impossible but we shouldn’t stop trying.
I believe that sickness can be a big, important part of your life and still not define you.

k thanks i’m here all week



All I Can Eat App

WHERE HAS THIS BEEN ALL MY LIFE? This app, available for free (with bottom ads) on iOS and Google Play store and is an app designed to help people with food intolerances find foods without xyz or low in xyz. The categories are customizable and you can turn on/off intolerances at any time and the search parameters will adjust.

The app allows you to search for foods that contain the following: lactose, fructose, histamine, gluten, sorbitol, and salicyclic acid. There is a search function, you can look up foods by category, and even input your own custom foods or meals. This app is very exciting from a mast cell perspective as it can be difficult to find information on histamine levels in foods but can really be helpful for anyone with food allergies or intolerances or who are on specific diets.

Below are some screenshots of what the app looks like, and how it is laid out. I have not tested it for accessibility yet, but will update if I do. This post is not sponsored or affiliated in anyway, I was just thankful someone showed it to me!

Feeding Tube Resources

All the things (that I can think of) I wish I had when I got a tube. *work in progress*

Feeding Tube/Supplemental Nutrition focused Companies/Orgs

Oley FoundationOley is home to many a great resource from conferences to webinars to blogs from tube fed families, to equipment loans and donations!

Some quick go to resources from them are:
Tube Feeding Tips Page
Choosing the Right Tube
Parent/Patient Recommended Accessories
Equipment Exchange/Supply Store
Recorded Webinars

Gastroparesis Patient Association for Cures and Treatment(G-PACT)

Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation
Useful Products
Infinity Pump Manual for Friends and Family
Taping and Site Care

Complex Child: online monthly magazine written by parents of children with special needs which often features resources and stories about tube feeding.
Tube Feeding Information

Replacing a low profile G or J tube

Blogs/Vlogs by People with Feeding Tubes (or their parents)

The Tube Fed Wife

Feeding Tube Awareness

February 4-8th was Feeding Tube Awareness Week. This post will be mostly about types of feeding tubes and feeding as well as some possible reasons why someone might use a feeding tube as I have found few people actually know much about tubes. Ideally, I will also be creating posts about tips and tricks for living with a feeding tube and my experience as a young adult who uses a feeding tube. *lol I tried to get it done on the actual week*

Types of Feeding Tubes

Nasal Tubes

The two main types of nasal (up the nose) tubes are nasogastric (NG) and nasojejunal (NJ) tubes. These are thin, flexible tubes that are inserted through the nose. Both tubes are primarily for temporary and trial use and can often look similar from the outside. The main difference between these two tubes is where they go inside the body. These tubes can be left for 2-6 weeks per tube.

NG tubes are tubes that are inserted through the nose, go down your throat, and end in your stomach. These tubes are common inpatient and outpatient for acute needs or for temporary trialing of tube feeds, however, some patients chose to use NG tubes long term as (with training) they can be inserted and removed at home and therefore can only be on their face while feeding (usually at night in those cases)

NJ tubes are tubes that are inserted through the nose, go down your throat, through your stomach and the first part of your small intestine and into your jejunum. These tubes are less common and need to be inserted by a doctor with imaging to guide the tube into the right place. Many patients have NJ tubes if they have significant vomiting, have an improperly functioning stomach, or cannot tolerate feeding into their stomachs.

Surgical Tubes

There are three main types of surgically (or endoscopically) placed feeding tubes: gastrostomy (G tube), jejunostomy (J/ “straight J” tube), and a gastrojejunostomy (GJ tube). While these are considered more permanent tubes, they can be removed if the tube is no longer needed. These tubes are placed by creating a stoma, or opening that allows the tube to connect to the stomach or intestine, essentially it is an extreme body piercing.

Low profile G tube on left, traditional g tube on right

Within these options there are also some differentiations based on the type of tubing and the securement device. Options vary from traditional tube (aka danglers) to low-profile tubes that sit more flush with the skin. Tubes can also vary in how they are held in place on the inside: balloon (filled with water), a hard bumper, or a capsule shaped bumper. Most tubes need to be changed out every couple of months but some can be changed out at home by the user!

That girl has a feeding tube but just ate some cookies! They must not need the tube!

There are many different reasons why someone may need a feeding tube. Some people are able to eat and drink and still needing a feeding tube. This can happen either because they have a very restricted or unreliable diet/food tolerance or because they cannot eat or drink enough to sustain themselves purely on oral intake. Some people can eat, but it makes them very sick and so they only eat on special occasions, however there are plenty of people with feeding tubes who cannot eat or drink at all (NPO). Whether someone can or can’t eat orally does not correlate to how much they need a feeding tube or how sick they are!

What are some reasons someone needs a feeding tube?

There are countless diagnoses that may require a feeding tube such as dysphagia, cancer, gastroparesis, mast cell disorder, IBD, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophy, ALS, MS, and many many more! Generally, people who need feeding tubes either: have difficulty swallowing, difficulty digesting/absorbing their food, have risk for aspiration (breathing food into lungs), cannot chew, have multiple food allergies, or have a gastrointestinal disorder that impairs their digestive tract.

Add a Smartphone to your holiday shopping list… for the seniors in your life

Okay, I know what you’re thinking. I’m crazy. I bet you tried to imagine your beloved senior texting, or even making a call and laughed. I was lucky enough to spend the summer around my grandpa, an 86 year old NASA physicist who helped put a man on the moon with the computing power of a basic calculator. In this time we upgraded him from a flip phone (which he never used when he had) to an iPhone 8. Why on earth did we embark on this learning journey with a man who had no desire to text, get addicted to Candy Crush, or even chat on the phone? Good question people of the internet. Turns out that 40 years working in wind tunnels without ear protection combined with age meant that my grandpa’s hearing just wasn’t cutting it and the hearing aids he had for the past two years weren’t either, it is a noisy world out there. So he went to his audiologist who recommended these next gen hearing aids that could be paired via bluetooth to a smartphone and adjusted  via an application. Pretty neat. 

Cue the learning process. As the family’s “tech” person, I spent my summer helping my grandpa learn to use his new hearing aids and smartphone and it has changed my perception on smartphones for older adults. Here are a few reasons you may want to consider switching your loved one to a smartphone.

Hearing Problems or Hearing Aid Use

Example of hearing aid and control application
  • Hearing Aid compatible smartphones: Many commercial hearing aids are now Bluetooth compatible. This means that once initially paired, the aids can be controlled (volume, directionality, power) via an application (hearing aid specific) on the smartphone. Additionally, settings can be adjusted so that their phone notifications (ringer, texts, etc) will ring in their hearing aids. For a list of iPhone compatible hearing aids click here. For general phone compatibility click here
  • Live Listen (Apple): This feature uses your iPhone’s mic to focus conversations in loud environments and stream this audio directly to hearing aids. This is a game changer for 1:1 conversations in public places and is compatible with several commercial hearing aids and is now compatible with air pods (wireless Apple headphones).
  • Sound Detectors (Samsung): This feature can be enabled and allows the phone to listen for doorbell sounds and crying babies (second one might want to leave off) and sends an alert to the user if that sound is detected.
  • Flashing Notifications: This allows users to have either the camera flash (iPhone) or the notification light (Android) flash for notifications (calls, texts, etc).

Vision

Magnifier App in iPhone
  • Dynamic Text/ Font Changes: These settings on various devices allow the user to make text larger in apps and on the web for those who have trouble with small type.
  • Magnifier (Apple)/ Magnifier Window (Samsung): This can be added to the control panel and uses the phone’s camera to magnify anything, newspaper, photo, or prescription bottle! In the app you can enable the flash to brighten the view, as well as invert colors/adjust contrast for easier viewing. On screen items can also be zoomed in for higher detail.
  • High Contrast Keyboard/Fonts (Samsung): These settings allow for high contrast keyboards and fonts which help for identification and reading

Dexterity Issues

Assistive Touch Menu on iPhone
  • Assistant Menu (Samsung)/ Assistive Touch (Apple): These menus help those who are new to touchscreen use and “gesture” control or have trouble with dexterity. These menus float on screen and allow complete control over the phone and functions just with single finger tapping.
  • Touch Accommodations (Apple): These are settings that can be enabled to ignore repeated accidental touches, or set the phone to register only the final position of a touch on screen as deliberate (i.e. if they touch and drag their finger it only selects what they end on). 
  • Siri and Google Assistant: No need to touch the screen, phones and function can be controlled with their voice!

Applications for Seniors

One of the many benefits of smartphones is access to the respective application stores. There is an app for just about anything and this does not exclude seniors both for fun and safety! Here are some of the types of apps that may be good to add to your loved one’s new phone. 

  • Medication Reminder Apps: Not only does this allow them to have a place with their up to date list of their medications but can delivery automatic reminders for them to take their medication, what it is, how many and even what it looks like! Many of the apps have cloud capabilities so that caregivers can check use and update remotely.
  • Panic buttons: Apps like this function similar to a fall alert button but have an app that will send location information to emergency contacts with the press of a button. Some are compatible with Siri and other voice commands.
  • ICE Medical Information: These applications (built in on some phones) allow the user to input critical medical information, emergency contacts, allergies, medications and other first responder information and can be accessed without needing to unlock the phone.
  • Video chat (FaceTime, Skype, Hangouts): Allow for long-distance relationships, sharing, and help finding those darn keys around the apartment.

If all of the above are not enough reason to reconsider getting granny an iPhone, also take into consideration learning new things can be exciting and help keep their faculties sharp. Sure, there is a learning curve and my grandpa has surely surprised me with his progress, but in my opinion it is worth it! My grandma even mastered emojis!

August is Digestive Tract Paralysis (DTP) Awareness Month

Digestive Tract Paralysis (DTP) refers to a group of conditions that affect the motility, or speed in which your body digests food and liquids, such as gastroparesis (GP), chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction (CIPO), and colonic inertia (CI). I have been diagnosed with esophageal dysmotility, gastroparesis, and colonic inertia and all have greatly effected my health and lifestyle.

Gastroparesis, or paralyzed stomach, is a condition where your stomach takes too long to digest and empty your stomach. GP can be primary, secondary, or idiopathic and can range from mild to severe (little to no motility). Common forms of secondary GP are diabetic GP, Post-abdominal surgery GP, post-viral GP, and GP from eating disorders. Some symptoms of GP according to GPACT are:

Early Satiety after a few bites of food

Nausea (especially after eating)

Vomiting (often undigested food from hours or even days before)

Abdominal Pain

Hiccupping

Excessive Belching

Bloating

Weight Gain

Weight Loss

Loss of Appetite

Malnutrition

Dehydration

Heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux which is not controlled by acid suppressants

Erratic blood glucose levels

Comic of stomach and intestine by the awkward yeti

 

For me, dysmotility has hijacked my love of food and made me realize how much our culture revolves around food. Out to dinner, snacks at the movies, family meals, holidays, snacking, period chocolate eating, late night iHOP runs, and lunch breaks at work. When you can’t eat or can only eat a few types of food in small amounts, you miss out on a lot. Not to mention if certain food smells make you nauseous- my DTP friends can probably relate to being nauseous and starving at the same time. Food is everywhere. DTP is part of the reason I have a feeding tube which givesme freedom but is also a pain. in. the. ass. I have to be fed into my intestine to bypass my damaged stomach (intestines are more functioning though also damaged). This requires being attached to a tube and pump anywhere from 12 to 24 hours a day.

But DTP doesn’t just effect eating, it effects medication absorption, acidity levels, bowel control, hydration, energy levels, weight, and definitely clothing sizes (bloating is no joke). We need a cure, we are starving for a cure. While there are some treatments available they often come with difficult side effects or are invasive. More research needs to be done for a cure to be found! To donate or find out more please visit the Gastroparesis Patient Association for Cures and Treatments (G-PACT)!

someecard

AT/Software for High School andCollege Students with Disabilities

Having a disability or being chronically ill in college comes with many challenges: time management, memory, missing class, taking notes, studying, typing papers, reading textbooks and more! While this by no means will be an extensive list, here are some applications, software, and modifications that you might find helpful broken down by task. *Note: if you have an IEP/504/ College Disability Accommodations, some of these may be available to you for free through your school or may be covered under insurance so talk to your case managers!*

Time Management:

Timeglass (Free)List of three timers in a screenshot of timeglass app

This is a simple application that allows for the use of multiple timers at once, including multistep timers, repeats, customizable icons, and a visual timer. There is a limited feature free version on iTunes.

 
VisTimer Lite (Free)
screenshot of visual timer
Another simple visual timer application that has customization options such as display size, circle color, alert sound, and time warnings. Available in iTunes Store here for free with ads, upgrade available. Compatible with iPhone and iPad.

 

 

Things 3 ($9.99 iPhone/Watch)

I have tried many to-do list-esque applications over the years and while most start off great I find I stop using them after a week or so because they are too complex, don’t sync well between devices, or don’t help. Things 3 is the exception. It has iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch and iMac/Macbook compability, iCloud, Reminders and calendar syncing, it clean and easy to use and helps me immensely with homework, projects, things I need to buy, and my “remind me to think of…”. It is available here.

screenshot highlighting the upcoming feature of Things3 appscreenshot of start page of things3 app
Why I love it:
  • items are easy to move, categorize and mark as complete
  • a log book is kept for your completed items for the inevitable “oh shit I didn’t actually do that” moments
  • it syncs well with devices
  • it syncs with iOS Reminders, Calendar (including google), iCloud, and various devices flawlessly
  • You can set due dates, reminders, and assign a time to complete it
  • You can make subcategories
  • It helps a lot with packing and grocery lists too

Taking Notes:

Microsoft OneNote (Free)

Microsoft OneNote is part of the Office365 suite and is like Word, Powerpoint, and a Notepad combined. It offers the users to create subject sections, draw freehand, add tags such as “question” “to-do” or “follow-up”, simultaneously record and take notes, highlight, change page color, and more! Additionally, if used on Windows, “Learning Tools” is a free package download that includes features such as text-to-speech, focus mode, font-spacing, page coloring options, reading tools for low vision, dyslexia and other print disabilities, and more! I find OneNote to be the most useful one touch screen devices, especially for working out things like math problems that are hard to type out correctly or quick sketches. OneNote is also integrated with Office Lens (below).

screenshot of OneNote application               screenshot of One Note app

Notability ($9.99)

screenshot of notability app on ipad

I have only just started using Notability by Ginger Labs instead of OneNote and while the two applications have large amounts of crossover in terms of functionality, I prefer Notability’s design as well as ease of integration of pictures, better functionality of audio recordings, more functional highlighter, and overall more functional to use and sync.

Writing/ Reading

Wrise ($59)

Wrise is an accessible word processor for Mac that includes word prediction, text-to-speech, tags, and an export to iTunes feature. It is made by Assistiveware and is switch compatible. It also has tools to help people who struggle with similar sounding words, spelling, and reading.

Dragon Dictation (Naturally Speaking- $69.99)

Dragon provides one of the best speech recognition/dictation softwares out there. For those with fine motor issues, hypermobility in fingers, or who just prefer to talk rather than type, this is an amazing software. Dragon works with most common word processors (Word, Notepad etc) and can also be integrated into social media and web browsing.

Studying

Quizlet (Free)

Quizlet is a free study tool that allows the user to make e-flashcards, practice tests, and learning games all from a study set. The free version allows for pictures to be used on flashcards as well but you are limited to a small database. Additionally, study sets can be shared with classmates, worked on collaboratively, or you can search for pre-made study sets by other users. Some of the really beneficial tools of quizlet are: web based with app options, several different modes for learning from traditional “flashcards” to an adaptive learning course that prepares you for your exam. As someone with a learning disability, the ability to have the cards/ questions read to me when I want to is a major plus.

Crash Course Videos (Free)

These videos are fantastic! While you are limited to the topics they cover, I find them informational and think they do a great job of summarizing and presenting information without being too complex. These are great reviews for science courses, history, and other introductory courses. Also just fun to watch to learn something new. They even have videos on study skills!

Khan Academy (Free)

For more specialized informational needs, especially in math and science, Khan Academy does a good job of summarizing, providing examples, and covers more discrete topics.

Other

Office Lens (Free)

Office Lens is a free mobile application (integrated with OneNote) that gives you a scanner and optical character recognition (OCR) in one application — and for free. I use this app all the time!

Things it can do:

  • take a picture of a whiteboard at an angle, auto-crop it, and perform OCR (scans and converts characters to type)
  • take a photo
  • take a picture of a business card, crop it and perform OCR
  • save anything you snap to camera roll, OneNote, PDF, email attachment and more
  • scan and read a document to you
  • scan a document, perform OCR, send document to OneNote, then edit the document
  • compatible with VoiceOver and switch access
    screenshot of note and keeble keyboard

Keeble Accessible Keyboard ($24.99)

Another product of Assistiveware, Keeble is for anyone with vision issues, limited use of hands, dyslexia, and switch users this app is an accessible keyboard that can be added just like a foreign language or emoji keyboard and allows for customization of color, font, word prediction, quick phrases, auditory feedback (speaks what you type), Open Dyslexic font, ALL CAPS, and arrangement (ex. switch user making keyboard in frequency order as opposed to QWERTY).

 

 

Hope some of this helps!

College a cycle chart