Tips for an Inclusive Halloween

Halloween can be a real struggle for kids (and adults) with disabilities. Here are some examples of aspects of halloween that are not accessible:

  1. Walking around in the dark
  2. Being surrounded by people who look different than normal
  3. Sensory considerations with costumes
  4. Sensory considerations with house decorations (flashing lights, motion activated stuff, jump scares)
  5. Lots of walking/ rolling and physical accessibility of getting to house’s doors
  6. Talking to strangers (Trick or treat, asking for candy, responding to what your costume is)
  7. Food allergies or inability to eat
  8. Fine motor skills needed to grab candy
Here are a few adaptations/considerations that will help mitigate these challenges:

Food allergies/ inability to eat: Meet the Teal Pumpkin Project

The Teal Pumpkin Project is an initiative to include those with food allergies or special diets in trick-or-treating and to raise awareness. To participate paint a pumpkin teal (or print a picture and tape it to your door) and stick it on your porch. When you go out to buy candy, also buy some non-food items for kids. Examples: silly bands, party favors, bouncy balls, silly putty, vampire teeth or stickers! Party stores have lots of this stuff! Then, when trick or treaters come, simply hold two bowls and let the child choose! Believe it or not, there are even some kids who just don’t like candy (real bummer for Halloween).
Resources and further details found here! This year they have even added a map where you can tell the world your house is participating!

Trick or Treaters who don’t say Trick or Treat

There can be many reasons why someone might not verbal say trick or treat. They may be deaf, have anxiety related speech issues, be nonverbal, or just unaware that they are supposed to/why they are supposed to. Some may carry cards like this. Some may have a communication device. Some may just expect you give them candy. When in doubt, just give the kid some candy!

Decorating Your House

Keep in mind that for kids, terrifying is more likely to mean they will skip your house rather than bravely wandering forward. Be careful of extension cords as tripping hazards, poorly lit uneven surfaces, steps needed to climb to get candy ratio and other dangerous factors that might be hard to see at night, kids are unpredictable and hopped up on sugar. Also consider use of strobe lights, fog machines, and motion activated decorations as they may cause sensory overload, breathing issues, seizures etc. If you do want to use a strobe light, set it at a lower interval and it will be less likely to cause problems. Remember: its about the candy, costumes and fun…
Pro Tip: If you live in a house with more than 5 steps you might want to consider sitting down by the sidewalk during the main rush to hand out candy if you don’t want to get skipped!

Be patient and Enjoy!

Give that kid who appear to be indecisive a little extra time to look at his options, he might have allergies, motor planning issues, or just wants to get candy he actually likes instead of accidentally grabbing the stinkin pretzel bag. Don’t force children to speak to get candy. Give compliments on costumes even if you have no idea what they just said they were but also keep in mind that a kid not wearing a costume may have sensory issues, fabric allergies, or is scared of costumes. Also, if a teenager, adult, or other non-kid comes to you trick or treating don’t make them feel out of place, they’re participating and nothing wrong with being a kid at heart!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

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