Where’s that Flintstones Chewable Morphine at?

      I know I literally just said I don’t like talking about my pain and now here I am doing a post on pain. I decided I felt like it was an important enough aspect of me and EDS and since I don’t often talk about it, awareness month might be a good time for that. So here goes!

#spoonielife
       I can not remember not being in pain, there may have been times where that has been the case but I thought I was normal until middle school (diagnosis backstory here). Nowadays, most of my chronic pain comes in one or all of the following forms: muscular (spasms, tears, fatigue and irritation from subluxations and dislocations), joint movements (subluxations and dislocations), mostly constant dull all over pain (I’m sure its a sign of being a demi-zebracorn?!), migraines (light sensistivity, eye strain, post-concussive issues, cervical spine subluxations, cerebrospinal fluid blockages, Chiari, position of the earth and sun, stress, lack of “good” sleep), GI pain (digestive tract paralysis, gastroparesis, mast cell activation in gut (MCAD) ), and other. Between allergies, MCAD sensitivities and Long QT Syndrome restrictions the only pain medication I can take is morphine and it gives me a lot of strange symptoms so I avoid it unless absolutely necessary. Pain management in EDS is almost always complicated due to the varying types of pain, comorbid conditions (including other pain disorders such as fibromyalgia), and severity and chronic nature of the pain. Because every case of EDS is different, what works for one might not work for another. I have zebra friends who manage pain with essential oils, some with opiates, some with PT and yoga, some with sheer willpower… everyone is different. 
      As EDS is a mostly invisible illness, people I meet and befriend are often shocked that I am in pain. I have learned to hide it well and have learned exactly how far I can push myself before the pain becomes too bad (though sometimes I totally disregard that knowledge). I really dislike that pain scale but on a good day I usually average a 5-6 and bad days a 8-9.5 for people who that means something to. Even well managed, pain effects your whole body, mind, and life. It does not have to control it, but it is a huge part of it. 
      Another thing I find people have a hard time understanding is the fluctuations or flare ups of chronic illnesses/chronic pain. This runs many into questions like “I saw you walking yesterday…why are you in a wheelchair now?” or “But last week you could unload the dishwasher, I saw you do it…are you just trying to get out of doing it?”. These questions can be prefaced either judgmentally or curiosity but are hard to deal with over and over again, especially on high pain days. Additionally, many of us face invalidation from medical professionals that impact our reactions and instincts, further complicating things. In my experience, leading a comment or question with “I want to understand but I’m confused…” usually gets a better reaction. Pain can be very isolating and can make us say or do things we don’t like. Pain sucks guys. DUH. 
May the forth be with you all and beware of the revenge of the sixth!

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